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AIDS Behav. 2013 May;17(4):1395-405. doi: 10.1007/s10461-012-0244-8.

Prevalence and correlates of unprotected anal intercourse among Hong Kong men who have sex with men traveling to Shenzhen, China.

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1
Centre for Health Behaviours Research, School of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 5/F, School of Public Health, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong. jlau@cuhk.edu.hk

Abstract

In China, the HIV prevalence among men who have sex with men (MSM) has been increasing sharply. A total of 195 Hong Kong MSM having had sex with men in Shenzhen, a mainland China city separated from Hong Kong by a border, were recruited from some randomly selected gay venues in Shenzhen. Participants were face-to-face and anonymously interviewed. The results showed that in the last six months, respectively 62.1, 84.6, and 31.3 % of the participants from Hong Kong had had sex with commercial sex partners (CSP), non-regular partners (NRP) and regular partners (RP) in Shenzhen. The prevalence of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) with these three types of sex partners was respectively 29.8, 27.9, and 78.7 %. Factors associated with UAI with any MSM in Shenzhen in the last six months included perceived chances of contracting HIV, perceived non-availability of condoms, giving money/gifts to Shenzhen MSM sex partners, and perception that MSM partners in Shenzhen would not always insist on condom use (multivariate OR = 2.9-13.90, p < 0.05), whilst factors of inverse associations included university education, having had sex with NRP but not with CSP and RP in Shenzhen and self-efficacy of insisting on condom use (multivariate OR = 0.04-0.22, p < 0.05). In sum, the prevalence of having multiple types of male sex partners and UAI was high. This was especially true when anal sex with RP was involved. Cross-border HIV prevention is greatly warranted. It should ensure condom availability and modify perceptions toward UAI.

PMID:
22760739
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-012-0244-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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