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Genes Dev. 2012 Jul 15;26(14):1612-25. doi: 10.1101/gad.193243.112. Epub 2012 Jul 3.

Regeneration of Drosophila sensory neuron axons and dendrites is regulated by the Akt pathway involving Pten and microRNA bantam.

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1
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Physiology, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94158, USA.

Abstract

Both cell-intrinsic and extrinsic pathways govern axon regeneration, but only a limited number of factors have been identified and it is not clear to what extent axon regeneration is evolutionarily conserved. Whether dendrites also regenerate is unknown. Here we report that, like the axons of mammalian sensory neurons, the axons of certain Drosophila dendritic arborization (da) neurons are capable of substantial regeneration in the periphery but not in the CNS, and activating the Akt pathway enhances axon regeneration in the CNS. Moreover, those da neurons capable of axon regeneration also display dendrite regeneration, which is cell type-specific, developmentally regulated, and associated with microtubule polarity reversal. Dendrite regeneration is restrained via inhibition of the Akt pathway in da neurons by the epithelial cell-derived microRNA bantam but is facilitated by cell-autonomous activation of the Akt pathway. Our study begins to reveal mechanisms for dendrite regeneration, which depends on both extrinsic and intrinsic factors, including the PTEN-Akt pathway that is also important for axon regeneration. We thus established an important new model system--the fly da neuron regeneration model that resembles the mammalian injury model--with which to study and gain novel insights into the regeneration machinery.

PMID:
22759636
PMCID:
PMC3404388
DOI:
10.1101/gad.193243.112
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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