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Accid Anal Prev. 1990 Dec;22(6):543-8.

The effects of mandatory seat belt legislation on self-reported seat belt use among male and female college students.

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  • 1Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond 23284-2018.

Abstract

The effect of seat belt legislation on self-reported seat belt use among male and female college students was investigated. Questionnaires inquiring about seat belt use were administered to college students on three separate occasions: (i) two months prior to the time a mandatory seat belt law went into effect, (ii) two months after the law went into effect, and (iii) 16 months after the law went into effect. Reported seat belt use increased significantly for male and female college students two months after the law took effect. At 16 months postlaw, reported seat belt use remained high for female students but declined almost to the prelaw level for males. Possible reasons offered for these findings are that male college students may be more resistant to having their behavior regulated and, therefore, less likely to internalize changes forced on them, and college-age males may be more inclined to engage in risk-taking behavior than college-age females. The importance of considering males and females separately with respect to seat belt use and interventions designed to increase seat belt use is discussed.

PMID:
2275737
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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