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Am J Epidemiol. 2012 Jul 15;176(2):108-16. doi: 10.1093/aje/kws002. Epub 2012 Jul 2.

Hyperuricemia in young adults and risk of insulin resistance, prediabetes, and diabetes: a 15-year follow-up study.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, USA. e.krishnan@stanford.edu

Abstract

The objective of this study was to assess the utility of hyperuricemia as a marker for diabetes and prediabetes (impaired fasting glucose) and insulin resistance in young adults. Using Cox proportional hazards regression models, the authors analyzed 15-year follow-up data on 5,012 persons in 4 US cities who were aged 18-30 years and diabetes-free at the time of enrollment. At baseline (1986), 88% of participants had a body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) less than 30. During the follow-up period (through 2001), the incidence rates of diabetes and prediabetes (insulin resistance and impaired fasting glucose) were higher among persons with greater serum urate concentrations. In multivariable Cox regression analyses that adjusted for age, gender, race, body mass index, family history of diabetes, diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, smoking, and alcohol use, the hazard ratios for diabetes, insulin resistance, and prediabetes among persons with hyperuricemia (serum urate level >7 mg/dL vs. ≤7.0 mg/dL) were 1.87 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.33, 2.62), 1.36 (95% CI: 1.23, 1.51), and 1.25 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.52), respectively. This observation was generally consistent across subgroups. The authors conclude that hyperuricemia in the midtwenties is an independent marker for predicting diabetes and prediabetes among young adults in the subsequent 15 years.

PMID:
22753829
DOI:
10.1093/aje/kws002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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