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J Autism Dev Disord. 2013 Feb;43(2):432-44. doi: 10.1007/s10803-012-1587-8.

The effects of autism and alexithymia on physiological and verbal responsiveness to music.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Whitehead Building, Goldsmiths, University of London, New Cross, London SE14 6NW, UK. r.allen@gold.ac.uk

Abstract

It has been suggested that individuals with autism will be less responsive to the emotional content of music than typical individuals. With the aim of testing this hypothesis, a group of high-functioning adults on the autism spectrum was compared with a group of matched controls on two measures of emotional responsiveness to music, comprising physiological and verbal measures. Impairment in participants ability to verbalize their emotions (type-II alexithymia) was also assessed. The groups did not differ significantly on physiological responsiveness, but the autism group was significantly lower on the verbal measure. However, inclusion of the alexithymia score as a mediator variable nullified this group difference, suggesting that the difference was due not to absence of underlying emotional responsiveness to music in autism, but to a reduced ability to articulate it.

PMID:
22752845
DOI:
10.1007/s10803-012-1587-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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