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Respir Med. 2012 Oct;106(10):1376-82. doi: 10.1016/j.rmed.2012.06.007. Epub 2012 Jun 30.

Skin-blanching is associated with FEV(1), allergy, age and gender in asthma families.

Author information

1
Department of Pulmonology, Groningen Research Institute for Asthma and COPD, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. e.d.telenga@umcg.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Inhaled glucocorticosteroids reduce airway inflammation in asthma patients, thereby improving lung function and reducing airway hyperresponsiveness and symptoms. The response to glucocorticosteroids can be measured with the glucocorticosteroid skin-blanching test. We investigated if asthmatics have a lower skin-blanching response to glucocorticosteroids than non-asthmatic subjects and if asthmatics with airway obstruction have lower skin-blanching response than those without obstruction. Finally, we assessed which clinical and inflammatory parameters influence the variability in skin-blanching response.

METHODS:

We evaluated the skin-blanching response to topical budesonide in a large group of 315 well-characterized asthmatics and their relatives (asthma n = 114, healthy n = 140, other = 61).

RESULTS:

The skin-blanching scores of the asthma probands and their healthy spouses were not significantly different. The skin-blanching score of patients with FEV(1) < 80% predicted was lower than of patients without obstruction. Lower skin-blanching score was significantly associated with lower FEV(1) %predicted, higher age, female gender, absence of allergy and summer season, but not with use of inhaled or oral glucocorticosteroids or packyears smoking.

CONCLUSIONS:

Asthmatics do not have lower skin-blanching response to glucocorticosteroids than healthy subjects. Furthermore, lower skin-blanching response to glucocorticosteroids is associated with lower FEV(1), female gender, higher age and the absence of allergy.

PMID:
22749754
DOI:
10.1016/j.rmed.2012.06.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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