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BMJ. 2012 Jun 26;344:e4026. doi: 10.1136/bmj.e4026.

Low carbohydrate-high protein diet and incidence of cardiovascular diseases in Swedish women: prospective cohort study.

Author information

1
Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, 75 M. Asias Street, Goudi, GR-115 27 Athens, Greece. pdlagiou@med.uoa.gr

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study the long term consequences of low carbohydrate diets, generally characterised by concomitant increases in protein intake, on cardiovascular health.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Uppsala, Sweden.

PARTICIPANTS:

From a random population sample, 43,396 Swedish women, aged 30-49 years at baseline, completed an extensive dietary questionnaire and were followed-up for an average of 15.7 years.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Association of incident cardiovascular diseases (ascertained by linkage with nationwide registries), overall and by diagnostic category, with decreasing carbohydrate intake (in tenths), increasing protein intake (in tenths), and an additive combination of these variables (low carbohydrate-high protein score, from 2 to 20), adjusted for intake of energy, intake of saturated and unsaturated fat, and several non-dietary variables.

RESULTS:

A one tenth decrease in carbohydrate intake or increase in protein intake or a 2 unit increase in the low carbohydrate-high protein score were all statistically significantly associated with increasing incidence of cardiovascular disease overall (n=1270)--incidence rate ratio estimates 1.04 (95% confidence interval 1.00 to 1.08), 1.04 (1.02 to 1.06), and 1.05 (1.02 to 1.08). No heterogeneity existed in the association of any of these scores with the five studied cardiovascular outcomes: ischaemic heart disease (n=703), ischaemic stroke (n=294), haemorrhagic stroke (n=70), subarachnoid haemorrhage (n=121), and peripheral arterial disease (n=82).

CONCLUSIONS:

Low carbohydrate-high protein diets, used on a regular basis and without consideration of the nature of carbohydrates or the source of proteins, are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

PMID:
22735105
PMCID:
PMC3383863
DOI:
10.1136/bmj.e4026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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