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Brain. 2012 Sep;135(Pt 9):2849-64. doi: 10.1093/brain/aws150. Epub 2012 Jun 22.

Beta-band intermuscular coherence: a novel biomarker of upper motor neuron dysfunction in motor neuron disease.

Author information

1
Institute of Neuroscience, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK.

Abstract

In motor neuron disease, the focus of therapy is to prevent or slow neuronal degeneration with neuroprotective pharmacological agents; early diagnosis and treatment are thus essential. Incorporation of needle electromyographic evidence of lower motor neuron degeneration into diagnostic criteria has undoubtedly advanced diagnosis, but even earlier diagnosis might be possible by including tests of subclinical upper motor neuron disease. We hypothesized that beta-band (15-30 Hz) intermuscular coherence could be used as an electrophysiological marker of upper motor neuron integrity in such patients. We measured intermuscular coherence in eight patients who conformed to established diagnostic criteria for primary lateral sclerosis and six patients with progressive muscular atrophy, together with 16 age-matched controls. In the primary lateral sclerosis variant of motor neuron disease, there is selective destruction of motor cortical layer V pyramidal neurons and degeneration of the corticospinal tract, without involvement of anterior horn cells. In progressive muscular atrophy, there is selective degeneration of anterior horn cells but a normal corticospinal tract. All patients with primary lateral sclerosis had abnormal motor-evoked potentials as assessed using transcranial magnetic stimulation, whereas these were similar to controls in progressive muscular atrophy. Upper and lower limb intermuscular coherence was measured during a precision grip and an ankle dorsiflexion task, respectively. Significant beta-band coherence was observed in all control subjects and all patients with progressive muscular atrophy tested, but not in the patients with primary lateral sclerosis. We conclude that intermuscular coherence in the 15-30 Hz range is dependent on an intact corticospinal tract but persists in the face of selective anterior horn cell destruction. Based on the distributions of coherence values measured from patients with primary lateral sclerosis and control subjects, we estimated the likelihood that a given measurement reflects corticospinal tract degeneration. Therefore, intermuscular coherence has potential as a quantitative test of subclinical upper motor neuron involvement in motor neuron disease.

PMID:
22734124
PMCID:
PMC3437020
DOI:
10.1093/brain/aws150
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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