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Cancer Causes Control. 2013 Apr;24(4):637-47. doi: 10.1007/s10552-012-9998-6. Epub 2012 Jun 23.

Correlates of fruit and vegetable consumption among construction laborers and motor freight workers.

Author information

1
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Center for Community-Based Research, Boston, MA 02115-5450, USA. eve_nagler@dfci.harvard.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The aim of this study was to compare and contrast correlates of fruit and vegetable consumption in two blue-collar populations: construction laborers and motor freight workers.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional data were collected from two groups of male workers: (1) construction laborers (n = 1,013; response rate = 44 %) randomly selected from a national sample, as part of a diet and smoking cessation study; and (2) motor freight workers (n = 542; response rate = 78 %) employed in eight trucking terminals, as part of a tobacco cessation and weight management study. Data were analyzed using linear regression modeling methods.

RESULTS:

For both groups, higher income and believing it was important to eat right because of work were positively associated with fruit and vegetable consumption; conversely, being white was associated with lower intake. Construction laborers who reported eating junk food due to workplace stress and fatigue had lower fruit and vegetable intake. For motor freight workers, perceiving fast food to be the only choice at work and lack of time to eat right were associated with lower consumption.

CONCLUSION:

Comparing occupational groups illustrates how work experiences may be related to fruit and vegetable consumption in different ways as well as facilitates the development of interventions that can be used across groups.

PMID:
22729935
PMCID:
PMC3784996
DOI:
10.1007/s10552-012-9998-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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