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Actas Dermosifiliogr. 2012 Nov;103(9):806-15. doi: 10.1016/j.ad.2012.01.017. Epub 2012 Jun 23.

Outpatient treatment of infantile hemangiomas with propranolol: a prospective study.

[Article in English, Spanish]

Author information

1
Servicio de Dermatología, Hospital General Universitario de Alicante, Alicante, España. betlloch_isa@gva.es

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the safety and effectiveness of oral propranolol (OP) in the treatment of infantile hemangiomas.

MATERIAL AND METHOD:

We conducted a prospective study of infantile hemangiomas (IHs) treated with oral propranolol between October 2008 and March 2011. We included fast-growing IHs in the proliferative phase, IHs affecting vital structures, ulcerated IHs, and IHs that could cause functional or aesthetic problems after the proliferative phase. The patients received oral propranolol 2mg/kg/d and were monitored on an outpatient basis. Response to treatment was assessed by volume reduction, lightening of color, improvement of symptoms, and parent satisfaction. Time of initial and peak response, as well as side effects and sequelae, were recorded.

RESULTS:

We analyzed 20 IHs, corresponding to 17 girls and 3 boys. The main sites of involvement were around the eyes (20%), the nose (15%), the neck (15%), and the trunk (15%). Ninety percent of the hemangiomas were focal and in the proliferative phase. Treatment was started between the ages of 2 and 19 months and the main reason for starting treatment was rapid growth (50% of cases). Initial response was observed in 70% of cases and only in 2 of them it took over a month. Peak response occurred at 3 months. All the IHs responded to treatment; response was excellent in 55% of cases, good in 35%, and minimal in 10%. The following factors were predictive of response: focal IH, proliferative phase, periorbital location, and ulceration. No serious side effects were observed.

CONCLUSION:

Oral propranolol was clinically effective in reducing the volume and color of infantile hemangiomas, although the reduction was not complete and telangiectasia and scarring persisted after treatment. Oral propranolol also proved to be safe for use in outpatients.

PMID:
22727954
DOI:
10.1016/j.ad.2012.01.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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