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Neuron. 2012 Jun 21;74(6):1114-24. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2012.04.036.

A real-world size organization of object responses in occipitotemporal cortex.

Author information

1
Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. tkonkle@mit.edu

Abstract

While there are selective regions of occipitotemporal cortex that respond to faces, letters, and bodies, the large-scale neural organization of most object categories remains unknown. Here, we find that object representations can be differentiated along the ventral temporal cortex by their real-world size. In a functional neuroimaging experiment, observers were shown pictures of big and small real-world objects (e.g., table, bathtub; paperclip, cup), presented at the same retinal size. We observed a consistent medial-to-lateral organization of big and small object preferences in the ventral temporal cortex, mirrored along the lateral surface. Regions in the lateral-occipital, inferotemporal, and parahippocampal cortices showed strong peaks of differential real-world size selectivity and maintained these preferences over changes in retinal size and in mental imagery. These data demonstrate that the real-world size of objects can provide insight into the spatial topography of object representation.

PMID:
22726840
PMCID:
PMC3391318
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2012.04.036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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