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Addiction. 2012 Dec;107(12):2201-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2012.03990.x. Epub 2012 Aug 20.

Who is most susceptible to movie smoking effects? Exploring the impacts of race and socio-economic status.

Author information

1
Cancer Control Research Program, Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH 03756, USA.

Abstract

AIMS:

This study assesses how race/ethnicity and socio-economic status modify the relationship between exposure to movie smoking and having tried smoking in adolescents.

DESIGN:

Data come from a cross-sectional telephone survey and were analyzed using logistic regression models. A respondent reporting ever having tried smoking was regressed on exposure to movie smoking, race, socio-economic status, the interactions of these variables and family and background characteristics.

SETTING:

National sample of US adolescents.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 3653 respondents aged 13-18 years.

MEASUREMENTS:

Outcome was if subjects reported ever having tried smoking. Movie smoking exposure was assessed through respondents' reporting having watched a set of movie titles, which were coded for smoking instances.

FINDINGS:

The proportion having tried smoking was lower for blacks (32%) compared to Hispanics (41%) and whites (38%). The relationship between movie smoking and having tried smoking varied by race/ethnicity. Among whites and Hispanics exposure to movie smoking positively predicted smoking behavior, but movie smoking had no impact on blacks. Socio-economic status further modified the relation among whites; high socio-economic status white adolescents were more susceptible to movie smoking than low socio-economic status white adolescents.

CONCLUSIONS:

Exposure to movie smoking is not experienced uniformly as a risk factor for having ever tried smoking among US adolescents. Whites and Hispanics are more likely to try smoking as a function of increased exposure to movie smoking. In addition, higher socio-economic status increases susceptibility to movie smoking among whites. Youth with fewer risk factors may be more influenced by media messages on smoking.

PMID:
22724674
PMCID:
PMC3465477
DOI:
10.1111/j.1360-0443.2012.03990.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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