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World Neurosurg. 2014 Jan;81(1):191-7. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2012.06.030. Epub 2012 Jun 18.

Jacques Bénigne Winslow (1669-1760) and the misnomer cavernous sinus.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, Louisiana State University for Medical Sciences, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA.
2
Department of Neurosurgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA.
3
Department of Neurosurgery, Louisiana State University for Medical Sciences, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA. Electronic address: ananda@lsuhsc.edu.

Abstract

Sinus cavernosi, or the cavernous sinus, was coined by Jacques Bénigne Winslow in the 18th century. Among the neurosurgeons and the modern-day neuroanatomists, Winslow is mainly known for erroneously using the term cavernous sinus. As the anatomical understanding of the parasellar space advanced during the next 200 years, it was unclear as to why Winslow compared this space in the brain with that of a male reproductive organ (corpus cavernosum). Our primary objective was to study the historical treatise on anatomy written by Winslow in the 18th century and analyze his anatomical dissections and nomenclature for the parasellar compartment. In addition, his pertinent contributions to neuroscience are highlighted in this vignette.

KEYWORDS:

Cavernous; Neuroanatomy; Parasellar

PMID:
22722038
DOI:
10.1016/j.wneu.2012.06.030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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