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J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2012 Nov;65(11):1451-60. doi: 10.1016/j.bjps.2012.05.005. Epub 2012 Jun 19.

Percutaneous sclerotherapy of vascular malformations in children using sodium tetradecyl sulphate: the Birmingham experience.

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1
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Birmingham Children's Hospital, Steelhouse Lane, Birmingham B4 6NH, West Midlands, United Kingdom. kennethkok@gmail.com

Abstract

INTRODUCTION AND AIMS:

Sclerotherapy has become first line treatment for most venous malformations and some lymphatic malformations. We aimed to measure our sclerotherapy treatment success using 3% sodium tetradecyl sulphate (STD) and describe our experience.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Retrospective five year review (Jan 04-09) of children with vascular malformations treated at our centre with 3% STD. Patients were classified using the Birmingham classification and treatment success was measured through case note review and pre- and post-treatment photographs. FINDINGS AND RESULTS: Forty-three (84.3%) of the 51 patients with vascular malformations (VM) who underwent sclerotherapy derived a benefit. Twelve patients (23.5%) had an excellent result, 31 (60.8%) were improved whilst eight (15.7%) were unchanged. Using Fisher's exact test, there was a statistically significant difference in achieving complete resolution of superficial VMs compared to lesions involving the deeper layers of the head and neck. 17.6% of patients developed a complication with an overall complication rate of 12.2% per injection. There was one major complication with the remainder consisting of superficial skin necrosis that resolved conservatively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Treatment with 3% STD sclerotherapy is effective in venous and some lymphatic vascular malformations. It should be considered an important treatment modality within a multi-disciplinary setting in these difficult problems.

PMID:
22717975
DOI:
10.1016/j.bjps.2012.05.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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