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Int Urogynecol J. 2013 Feb;24(2):325-30. doi: 10.1007/s00192-012-1854-4. Epub 2012 Jun 21.

Changes in urinary nerve growth factor and prostaglandin E2 in women with overactive bladder after anticholinergics.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, Bucheon St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 2, Sosa-dong, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon, Kyunggi-do 420-717, Korea.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS:

The aim of this study is to investigate changes in urinary nerve growth factor (NGF) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in women with overactive bladder (OAB) following anticholinergic treatment.

METHODS:

A total of 30 female patients with OAB were enrolled and the control group included 15 healthy women who did not present any bladder symptoms. All subjects with OAB recorded voiding diaries, underwent urodynamic study, and were evaluated for urgency grade. They received anticholinergic treatment for 4 weeks, after which they were again evaluated for urinary urgency grade and voiding diaries. OAB patients were classified into three groups according to the change on the 5-point Urinary Sensation Scale after the treatment: group 1 (no change in urgency grade), group 2 (1 point of improvement), and, group 3 (more than 2 points of improvement). Urinary NGF and PGE(2) levels between controls and OAB patients (before and after treatment in groups 1, 2, and 3) were compared.

RESULTS:

Urinary NGF and PGE(2) levels were significantly higher in OAB patients than in the controls. NGF levels were not significantly different between pre- and post-treatment in groups 1 and 2. However, in group 3, NGF levels were significantly decreased after treatment. PGE(2) levels were not significantly different between pre- and post-treatment in either group.

CONCLUSIONS:

NGF and PGE(2) have important roles in the development of OAB symptoms in women. Initial reduction of urgency severity after anticholinergic treatment in women with OAB could be associated with decreasing urinary NGF levels.

PMID:
22717785
DOI:
10.1007/s00192-012-1854-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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