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Curr Pharm Des. 2012;18(32):4906-14.

Cannabis in the arm: what can we learn from intravenous cannabinoid studies?

Author information

1
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Denmark Hill, London SE5 8AF. amir.englund@kcl.ac.uk

Abstract

Cannabis is widely used recreationally and for symptomatic relief in a number of ailments. However, cannabis has been implicated as a risk factor for the development of psychotic illness. For forty years researchers have utilised intravenous preparations of Δ(9)-THC, as well as several other phytocannabinoids, in a laboratory setting. The intravenous route has the most reliable pharmacokinetics, reducing inter-individual variation in bioavailability and is well suited for the delivery of synthetic compounds containing a sole pharmacological moiety. Given the association between cannabinoids and psychotic illness, there has been a resurgence of interest in experimental studies of cannabinoids in humans, and the intravenous route has been employed. Here in a critical review, we appraise the major findings from recent intravenous cannabinoid studies in humans and trace the historical roots of this work back to the 1970's.

PMID:
22716141
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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