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Mov Disord. 2012 Jul;27(8):980-7. doi: 10.1002/mds.25050. Epub 2012 Jun 19.

Alcohol and risk of Parkinson's disease in a large, prospective cohort of men and women.

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1
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. palacios@hsph.harvard.edu

Abstract

Addictive behaviors, such as cigarette smoking and coffee drinking, have been associated with a reduced risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). Whether alcohol consumption is also associated with PD risk is less certain. We prospectively followed 132,403 participants in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort from 1992 to 2005. Alcohol intake was assessed at baseline. Incident cases of PD (n = 605; 389 male and 216 female) were confirmed by treating physicians and medical record review. Relative risks (RRs) were estimated using proportional hazards models, adjusting for age, smoking, and other risk factors. Alcohol consumption was not significantly associated with PD risk. After adjustment for age, smoking, and other risk factors, the RR comparing men consuming 30 or more grams of alcohol per day (highest category) to nondrinker men was 1.29 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.90, 1.86; P trend: 0.40), and the RR comparing women consuming 15 or more grams of alcohol (highest category) per day to nondrinker women was 0.77 (95% CI: 0.41, 1.45; P trend: 0.87). Consumption of beer, wine, or liquor was also not associated with PD risk. The results of this large, prospective study do not support an association between alcohol intake and risk of PD.

PMID:
22714720
PMCID:
PMC3548327
DOI:
10.1002/mds.25050
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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