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J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2012 Sep;144(3):671-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2012.05.031. Epub 2012 Jun 17.

Early readmission for congestive heart failure predicts late mortality after cardiac surgery.

Author information

1
Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. ricklee@nmh.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Early readmission in patients hospitalized for medical congestive heart failure is common, expensive, and associated with a worse late survival. Our objective was to compare late survival in patients' readmission for congestive heart failure with readmission for other causes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

METHODS:

Of 3654 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery at a single institution between April 2004 and June 2010, 3492 (96%) were discharged from the hospital before 30 days and analyzed. Survival curves by readmission reason were compared using the log-rank test. Multivariable analyses adjusted for patient demographics, known preoperative cardiac risk factors, and surgical characteristics.

RESULTS:

The readmission rate at 30 days was 13% (465/3492): 23% for arrhythmias/heart block, 12% for congestive heart failure, 40% for surgery related causes, 14% for infection, and 11% for noncardiac causes. Independent risk factors for readmission include age, gender, congestive heart failure, and cardiopulmonary bypass time. Eight percent (268/3492) of discharged patients died within the 6-year study: 14% in the readmission group versus 7% in the nonreadmission group (P < .01). Patients who had been readmitted for congestive heart failure had worse late survivals compared with all patients who had been readmitted for causes related to their surgery.

CONCLUSIONS:

Readmission within 30 days after cardiac surgery for congestive heart failure predicts late mortality. Targeted postoperative management may be warranted in patients with surgical congestive heart failure.

PMID:
22713305
DOI:
10.1016/j.jtcvs.2012.05.031
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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