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Eur J Epidemiol. 2012 Aug;27(8):633-45. doi: 10.1007/s10654-012-9706-6. Epub 2012 Jun 19.

Inflammation, coagulation and risk of locomotor disability in elderly women: findings from the British Women's Heart and Health Study.

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1
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK. eveline.nuesch@lshtm.ac.uk

Abstract

This study investigated associations between chronic inflammation and coagulation and incident locomotor disability using prospective data from the British Women's Heart and Health Study. Locomotor disability was assessed using self-reported questionnaires in 1999/2000, and 3 and 7 years later. Scores for inflammation and coagulation were obtained from summation of quartile categories of all available biomarkers from blood samples taken at baseline. 534 women developed locomotor disability after 3 years, 260 women after 7 years, while 871 women remained free of locomotor disability over the whole study period. After adjustment for demographic characteristics, lifestyle factors and health conditions, we found associations between inflammation and incident locomotor disability after three (OR per unit increase in score = 1.08, 95 % confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 1.13) and 7 years (OR = 1.10, 95 % CI: 1.03, 1.18) and between coagulation and incident locomotor disability after 3 (OR = 1.06, 95 % CI: 0.98, 1.14) and 7 years (OR = 1.09, 95 % CI: 1.00, 1.18). This corresponds to ORs between 1.8 and 2.4 comparing women with highest to lowest inflammation or coagulation scores. These results support the role of inflammation and coagulation in the development of locomotor disability in elderly women irrespective of their lifestyle factors and underlying age-related chronic diseases.

PMID:
22711587
DOI:
10.1007/s10654-012-9706-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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