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Curr Opin Infect Dis. 2012 Aug;25(4):438-44. doi: 10.1097/QCO.0b013e3283553362.

Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) disease in the setting of transplantation.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington 98115, USA. danielle.zerr@seattlechildrens.org

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) frequently reactivates after solid-organ and hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), and it has been associated with important outcomes in these settings. In 1-2% of recipients or donors, HHV-6 was inherited through chromosomal integration. Although HHV-6 chromosomal integration has not been associated with disease, the resulting very high levels of HHV-6 DNA in human tissue and blood samples can be challenging to interpret in the transplant setting. This review addresses the recent findings regarding the clinical outcomes associated with HHV-6 as well as diagnostic and therapeutic concerns.

RECENT FINDINGS:

The evidence supports a causal association between HHV-6 and central nervous system disease. New studies have further characterized the impact of HHV-6 on the central nervous system. In addition, new studies have explored the associations between HHV-6 and other important outcomes. The implications of integrated HHV-6 in transplant recipients remain undefined, though the possibility of an association with organ rejection has been suggested. New exploratory data exist regarding the safety of antiviral prophylactic and preemptive strategies.

SUMMARY:

Our understanding of the full clinical impact of HHV-6 in the transplant population remains incomplete. A large antiviral trial would not only help to further define causality between HHV-6 associated clinical outcomes but also start to define preventive strategies.

PMID:
22710317
DOI:
10.1097/QCO.0b013e3283553362
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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