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Med Care. 2012 Oct;50(10):831-5.

Organizational justice in primary-care health centers and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Author information

1
Unit of Expertise in Work and Organizations, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. marianna.virtanen@ttl.fi

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Organizational justice has been put forward as a measure of leadership quality that is associated with better health among employees.

OBJECTIVES:

We extended that idea to test whether perceived organizational justice among health care providers might be positively associated with glycemic control among their diabetic patients.

SETTING:

Eighteen primary-care health centers (HCs) in Finland.

PARTICIPANTS:

Type 2 diabetes patients (n=8954) and HC staff (n=422).

MEASUREMENTS:

: Mean of 1 year's measurements of glycated hemoglobin [≥ 7.0 (the least optimal); 6.5-6.9; 6.0-6.4; and 4.5-5.9 (the most optimal)], health-center psychosocial work characteristics (staff-reported procedural justice and relational justice, effort-reward imbalance, and work-unit team climate), and individual-level and work-unit-level covariates.

RESULTS:

Perceptions of higher levels of procedural justice among staff were associated with more optimal glycated hemoglobin levels among patients (cumulative odds ratio per 1-U increase in justice=1.54, 95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.18) after adjustment for patient-level and unit-level covariates. Relational justice, effort-reward imbalance, and work-unit team climate were not associated with glycemic control.

CONCLUSION:

The quality of leadership at HCs, as indicated by staff perceptions of procedural justice, may play a role in achieving good glycemic control among type 2 diabetes patients.

PMID:
22710278
DOI:
10.1097/MLR.0b013e31825dd741
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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