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Am Heart J. 2012 Jun;163(6):903-11. doi: 10.1016/j.ahj.2012.03.017.

From pressure overload to volume overload: aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

Author information

1
Cardiology and Angiology, BG University-Hospital Bergmannsheil, Bürkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, Bochum, Germany. michael_gotzmann@web.de

Abstract

Severe aortic valve stenosis is a common valvular heart disease that is characterized by left ventricular (LV) pressure overload. A lasting effect of pressure overload is LV remodeling, accompanied by concentric hypertrophy and increased myocardial stiffness. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as an alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement for patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis and high surgical risk. Although TAVI has favorable hemodynamic performance, aortic valve regurgitation (AR) is the most frequent complication because of the specific technique used for implantation of transcatheter valves. During implantation, the calcified native valve is pushed aside, and the prosthesis usually achieves only an incomplete prosthesis apposition. As a consequence, the reported prevalence of moderate and severe AR after TAVI is 6% to 21%, which is considerably higher than that after a surgical valve replacement. Although mild AR probably has minor hemodynamic effects, even moderate AR might result in serious consequences. In moderate and severe AR after TAVI, a normal-sized LV with increased myocardial stiffness has been exposed to volume overload. Because the noncompliant LV is unable to raise end-diastolic volume, the end-diastolic pressure increases, and the forward stroke volume decreases. In recent years, an increasing number of patients have successfully undergone TAVI. Despite encouraging overall results, a substantial number of patients receive neither symptomatic nor prognostic benefits from TAVI. Aortic valve regurgitation has been considered a potential contributor to morbidity and mortality after TAVI. Therefore, various strategies and improvements in valve designs are mandatory to reduce the prevalence of AR after TAVI.

PMID:
22709742
DOI:
10.1016/j.ahj.2012.03.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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