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Psychiatry Investig. 2012 Jun;9(2):134-42. doi: 10.4306/pi.2012.9.2.134. Epub 2012 Apr 30.

Prevalence of dementia and its correlates among participants in the National Early Dementia Detection Program during 2006-2009.

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  • 1Department of Psychiatry and Institute of Medical Science, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju, Korea. mdkim66@jejunu.ac.kr

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the prevalence of dementia and its correlates among people with poor socioeconomic status, poor social support systems, and poor performance on the Korean version of the Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE-KC).

METHODS:

We used 2006-2009 data of the National Early Dementia Detection Program (NEDDP) conducted on Jeju Island. This program included all residents >65 years old who were receiving financial assistance. We examined those who performed poorly (standard deviation from the norm of <-1.5) on the MMSE-KC administered as part of the NEDDP, using age-, gender-, and education-adjusted norms for Korean elders. A total of 1708 people were included in this category.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of dementia in this group was 20.5%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the following factors were statistically significantly associated with dementia: age of 80 or older, no education, nursing home residence, and depression.

CONCLUSION:

The prevalence of dementia is very high among those with lower MMSE-KC scores, and significant correlates include older age, no education, living in a nursing home, and depression. Enhancing lifetime education to improve individuals' cognitive reserves by providing intellectually challenging activities, encouraging living at home rather than in a nursing home, and preventing and treating depression in its early phase could reduce the prevalence of dementia in this population.

KEYWORDS:

Correlates; Dementia; MMSE-KC; Prevalence

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