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Ann Nutr Metab. 2012;60(3):215-9. doi: 10.1159/000338203. Epub 2012 Jun 6.

Non-breast milk feeding in developing countries: challenge from microbial and chemical contaminants.

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1
Instituto de NutriciĆ³n y Tecnologia de los Alimentos, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.

Abstract

Complementary foods based on cow's milk or gruels consumed by children in developing countries are often contaminated by bacteria during preparation, and ambient temperature rapidly increases microbial load. Thus infant formula or other weaning foods may cause diarrhea in young infants accounting for 25-33% of all deaths <5 years globally. Environmental chemicals such as metals (As, Pb, Cu) and nitrates can cause vomiting/diarrhea. Polychlorinated biphenyls derived from plastics, present in formula and/or breast milk, are endocrine disruptors (the potential threats are not fully quantifiable). The prevailing view is that benefits from breastfeeding outweigh potential risks.

PMID:
22699772
DOI:
10.1159/000338203
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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