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Am J Public Health. 2012 Aug;102(8):e30-6. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2012.300802. Epub 2012 Jun 14.

Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment: public health training for primary care.

Author information

1
Howard University College of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Washington, DC 20059, USA. vjmarshall@howard.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of this study was to elucidate changes in attitudes, experiences, readiness, and confidence levels of medical residents to perform screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) and factors that moderate these changes.

METHODS:

A cohort of 121 medical residents received an educational intervention. Self-reported experience, readiness, attitude, and confidence toward SBIRT-related skills were measured at baseline and at follow-up. Analyses were conducted to evaluate the effects of medical specialization.

RESULTS:

The intervention significantly increased experience (P<.001), attitude (P<.05), readiness (P<.001), and confidence (P<.001). Residents were more likely to report that their involvement influenced patients' substance use. However, experience applying SBIRT skills varied by country of birth, specialty, and baseline scores.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study suggested that SBIRT training was an effective educational tool that increased residents' sense of responsibility. However, application of skills might differ by specialization and other variables. Future studies are needed to explore and evaluate SBIRT knowledge obtained, within the context of cultural awareness and clinical skills.

Comment in

PMID:
22698040
PMCID:
PMC3464855
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2012.300802
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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