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AIDS. 2012 Sep 10;26(14):1775-9. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0b013e328356467a.

Bilateral oblique facial clefts and extremity anomaly in an infant after intrauterine efavirenz exposure and review of its teratogenic risk.

Author information

1
Center for Craniofacial Disorders, Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA. ashanske@aol.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Congenital anomalies may be caused by genetic or environmental factors or a combination of both. Oblique facial clefts are very rare congenital deformities. The occurrence of facial clefts and an extremity anomaly suggests a common underlying cause. Lateral oro-ocular clefts do not occur along normal developmental planes and may be part of the amnion disruption complex sequence. Our objective was to report a case of this very event, which also followed an unusual intrauterine exposure and review the literature on the teratogenic risk of efavirenz.

STUDY DESIGN:

We report a case of amniotic rupture sequence after fetal HIV and antiretroviral exposure.

RESULT:

Teratogenic exposure has been rarely reported and never after antiretroviral exposure.

CONCLUSION:

By reporting and registering more cases, we will be able to better assess the risks such medications pose to the developing fetus. The publication of a single case report has the potential to contribute to our knowledge of the significance of prenatal exposure to antiretrovirals and other medications for common HIV-associated disorders. It also generates a hypothesis that can be tested with further clinical data, animal models and epidemiologic studies.

PMID:
22695300
DOI:
10.1097/QAD.0b013e328356467a
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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