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J Neurol Sci. 2012 Sep 15;320(1-2):16-21. doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2012.05.049. Epub 2012 Jun 12.

Use of a rapid visual screening tool for the assessment of concussion in amateur rugby league: a pilot study.

Author information

1
Sports Performance Research Institute New Zealand, School of Sport and Recreation, Faculty of Health and Environmental Science, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand. dking@aut.ac.nz

Abstract

AIM:

This study undertook to use the K-D sideline test with the SCAT2 to see if concussions could be identified in amateur rugby league players over a representative competition period.

METHOD:

A prospective cohort study was conducted on two teams participating in an amateur rugby league. All players were tested for signs of concussion utilising the K-D test and players with longer times than their baseline scores undertook a further concussion assessment with the SCAT2.

RESULTS:

Five athletes with suspected concussion were evaluated by K-D testing. Three concussions were associated with witnessed events during the matches and two athletes were identified by the team medic as having longer K-D time scores incidentally post-match compared to baseline. Post-match K-D scores for all concussed athletes were worse than baseline for those with reported or witnessed concussion events (7s; 5.0-7.1; p=0.025) and for those identified incidentally (>5s; 8.9-9.1s). Both groups also reported more symptoms on the PCSS (a part of the SCAT2) post-match.

DISCUSSION:

In this rugby cohort, the K-D test was not only useful in identifying changes in players with witnessed head trauma, but in identifying changes in players with an un-witnessed suspected concussion.

PMID:
22694977
DOI:
10.1016/j.jns.2012.05.049
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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