Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Disabil Rehabil. 2013 Feb;35(3):257-64. doi: 10.3109/09638288.2012.691938. Epub 2012 Jun 12.

Self-management after stroke: time for some more questions?

Author information

1
Faculty of Health and Social Care Science, St George's University of London & Kingston University, UK. f.jones@sgul.kingston.ac.uk

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To discuss current research and issues which contribute towards the debate on the direction of self-management programmes for individuals after stroke and make recommendations for future research.

METHOD:

This paper includes a critical discussion on self-management specifically applied to stroke. The findings are positioned in the context of the wider stroke literature and debates on the suitability of different programmes.

RESULTS:

Three main areas of concern and potential opportunities were identified which contribute to the debate on self-management; the "individual stroke survivor"; "professional models and practice" and "organizational context".

CONCLUSION:

The body of literature on self-management programmes for people with stroke is relatively new and although research is building many issues are unknown. We have highlighted a number of potential areas of inquiry and concern. In order to further advance the research on stroke and self-management we believe a convergence of the evidence base for chronic disease self-management programmes and research which has illuminated the specific challenges and barriers of living with stroke is warranted. There is also a need to avoid the potential consequence of focusing on a "one-size" programme but rather develop interventions which can be inclusive of social aspects of self-management, and identify new methods of delivery.

PMID:
22691176
DOI:
10.3109/09638288.2012.691938
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Taylor & Francis
Loading ...
Support Center