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Epidemiol Infect. 2013 Mar;141(3):651-66. doi: 10.1017/S0950268812001136. Epub 2012 Jun 12.

Seroepidemiology of mumps in Europe (1996-2008): why do outbreaks occur in highly vaccinated populations?

Author information

1
European Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training (EPIET), European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), Stockholm, Sweden.
2
National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland.
3
Health Protection Agency Health Protection Services Colindale, London, UK.
4
Mater Dei Hospital, Malta.
5
School of Public Health, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel.
6
Laboratory of the State Agency Infection Centre, Virology Unit, Riga, Latvia.
7
National Public Health Surveillance Laboratory, Vilnius, Lithuania.
8
Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Stockholm, Sweden.
9
National Centre for Epidemiology, Budapest, Hungary.
10
National Institute of Public Health (SZU), Prague, Czech Republic.
11
Nicosia Hospital, Nicosia, Cyprus.
12
Surveillance & Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases, Laboratoire National de Santé, Luxembourg.
13
Health Protection Surveillance Centre, Dublin, Ireland.
14
Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain.
15
National Centre for Communicable Diseases Surveillance and Control, National Institute of Public Health, Romania.
16
Center for the Evaluation of Vaccination, Vaccine and Infectious Disease Institute (Vaxinfectio), University of Antwerp, Belgium.
17
Laboratory for Virology, NPHI, Slovenia.
18
Public Health Authority of the Slovak Republic, Bratislava, Slovak Republic.

Abstract

Mumps outbreaks have recently been recorded in a number of highly vaccinated populations. We related seroprevalence, epidemiological and vaccination data from 18 European countries participating in The European Sero-Epidemiology Network (ESEN) to their risk of mumps outbreaks in order to inform vaccination strategies. Samples from national population serum banks were collected, tested for mumps IgG antibodies and standardized for international comparisons. A comparative analysis between countries was undertaken using age-specific mumps seroprevalence data and information on reported mumps incidence, vaccine strains, vaccination programmes and vaccine coverage 5-12 years after sera collection. Mean geometric mumps antibody titres were lower in mumps outbreak countries [odds ratio (OR) 0·09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·01-0·71)]. MMR1 vaccine coverage ⩾95% remained protective in a multivariable model (P < 0·001), as did an interval of 4-8 years between doses (OR 0·08, 95% CI 0·01-0·85). Preventing outbreaks and controlling mumps probably requires several elements, including high-coverage vaccination programmes with MMR vaccine with 4-8 years between doses.

PMID:
22687578
DOI:
10.1017/S0950268812001136
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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