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Biophys J. 2012 May 16;102(10):2261-9. doi: 10.1016/j.bpj.2012.04.004. Epub 2012 May 15.

Identification of different proaggregatory abilities of activated platelet subpopulations.

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1
HemaCore (Hematological Corporation), Moscow, Russia.

Abstract

Blood platelets are anucleate cell fragments that play a critically important role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Platelets are activated with various agonists that allow them to aggregate, thus forming either hemostatic plugs or pathologic thrombi. Recent studies have revealed that at least two activated platelet subpopulations are formed upon potent stimulation of platelets with collagen and/or thrombin. One of these subpopulations consists of so-called coated platelets that express high levels of phosphatidylserine and retain α-granule proteins, including fibrinogen, on their surface. They also have reduced levels of the main aggregation receptor-activated glycoprotein IIb-IIIa, which might indicate a defect in their proaggregatory ability. In this study, the proaggregatory abilities of coated and noncoated platelets were assessed by means of light transmission aggregometry of suspensions with varying ratios of platelets from one subpopulation to those of a different subpopulation. A mathematical model of platelet aggregation in heterogeneous mixtures was developed to assist in the analysis of experimental data. Flow cytometry was employed to monitor platelet recruitment into aggregates and the ability of platelets to bind external fibrinogen. Finally, confocal microscopy was used to image coated platelets involved into aggregates formed by mechanical shaking. The obtained data revealed to our knowledge a novel mechanism regulating aggregate formation of platelet subpopulations: coated platelets cannot aggregate with each other but can be recruited into aggregates by noncoated platelets.

PMID:
22677379
PMCID:
PMC3353026
DOI:
10.1016/j.bpj.2012.04.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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