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Science. 2012 Jun 8;336(6086):1314-7. doi: 10.1126/science.1221789. Epub 2012 Jun 6.

Interactions between commensal fungi and the C-type lectin receptor Dectin-1 influence colitis.

Author information

1
Inflammatory Bowel and Immunobiology Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA.

Abstract

The intestinal microflora, typically equated with bacteria, influences diseases such as obesity and inflammatory bowel disease. Here, we show that the mammalian gut contains a rich fungal community that interacts with the immune system through the innate immune receptor Dectin-1. Mice lacking Dectin-1 exhibited increased susceptibility to chemically induced colitis, which was the result of altered responses to indigenous fungi. In humans, we identified a polymorphism in the gene for Dectin-1 (CLEC7A) that is strongly linked to a severe form of ulcerative colitis. Together, our findings reveal a eukaryotic fungal community in the gut (the "mycobiome") that coexists with bacteria and substantially expands the repertoire of organisms interacting with the intestinal immune system to influence health and disease.

PMID:
22674328
PMCID:
PMC3432565
DOI:
10.1126/science.1221789
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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