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Contraception. 2012 Nov;86(5):518-25. doi: 10.1016/j.contraception.2012.04.010. Epub 2012 Jun 4.

Influence of depressed mood and psychological stress symptoms on perceived oral contraceptive side effects and discontinuation in young minority women.

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1
Office of Population Research, Center for Health and Wellbeing, Princeton University, 228 Wallace Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA. kshall@princeton.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We examined the influence of depressed mood and psychological stress on oral contraceptive (OC) side effects and discontinuation.

STUDY DESIGN:

We administered standard psychological instruments to 354 young women (13-24 years old) beginning a 6-month OC continuation intervention trial and questions on OC side effects and use at 6 months. Logisitic regression determined the relationships between psychological conditions, perceived OC side effects and continuation rates.

RESULTS:

Baseline depressed mood (21%) and stress (19%) and 6-month mood (25%) and weight changes (57%) were relatively common. Only 38% continued OCs at 6 months. Depressed mood [odds ratio (OR) 2.27, confidence interval (CI) 1.25-4.15, p=.007] and stress (OR 2.07, CI 1.12-3.82, p=.02) were associated with perceived OC-related moodiness; depressed mood was associated with perceived weight loss (OR 1.89, CI 1.01-3.55, p=.05). Depressed mood (OR 0.54, CI 0.29-0.99, p=.04), stress (OR 0.48, CI 0.25-0.91, p=.03) and perceived weight change (OR 0.60, CI 0.38-0.94, p=.03) all reduced the likelihood of OC continuation.

CONCLUSION:

Young women with adverse psychological symptoms are at risk for perceived OC side effects and discontinuation.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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