Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Nutr J. 2012 Jun 6;11:37. doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-11-37.

Resting energy expenditure and carbohydrate oxidation are higher in elderly patients with COPD: a case control study.

Author information

1
Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba, Lins, SP, Brazil.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) usually have a compromised nutritional status which is an independent predictor of morbidity and mortality. To know the Resting Energy Expenditure (REE) and the substrate oxidation measurement is essential to prevent these complications. This study aimed to compare the REE, respiratory quotient (RQ) and body composition between patients with and without COPD.

METHODS:

This case-control study assessed 20 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease attending a pulmonary rehabilitation program. The group of subjects without COPD (control group) consisted of 20 elderly patients attending a university gym, patients of a private service and a public healthy care. Consumption of oxygen (O₂) and carbon dioxide (CO₂) was determined by indirect calorimetry and used for calculating the resting energy expenditure and respiratory quotient. Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were also measured. Percentage of body fat (%BF), lean mass (kg) and muscle mass (kg) were determined by bioimpedance. The fat free mass index (FFMI) and muscle mass index (MMI) were then calculated.

RESULTS:

The COPD group had lower BMI than control (p = 0.02). However, WC, % BF, FFMI and MM-I did not differ between the groups. The COPD group had greater RQ (p = 0.01), REE (p = 0.009) and carbohydrate oxidation (p = 0.002).

CONCLUSIONS:

Elderly patients with COPD had higher REE, RQ and carbohydrate oxidation than controls.

PMID:
22672689
PMCID:
PMC3502439
DOI:
10.1186/1475-2891-11-37
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center