Format

Send to

Choose Destination
CNS Neurosci Ther. 2012 Jun;18(6):501-8. doi: 10.1111/j.1755-5949.2012.00325.x.

Meta-analysis of association between particulate matter and stroke attack.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.

Abstract

AIMS:

We conducted systematic review as well as meta-analyses on the association between particulate matter and daily stroke attack from a number of epidemiologic studies.

METHODS:

Twelve quantitative studies about the associations between particulate matter and stroke attack met the inclusive criteria. We evaluated the odds ratio (OR) of stroke attack associated with per 10 μg/m(3) increase of the concentration of PM(10) (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm) or PM(2.5) (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm) as effect scale, and a sensitivity analysis for the results was conducted.

RESULTS:

In the time-series design, PM(10) exposure wasn't related to an increased risk of daily stroke attack [OR per 10 μg/m(3) = 1.002, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.999~1.005], PM(2.5) exposure were related to an increased risk of daily stroke attack (OR per 10 μg/m(3) = 1.006, 95%CI: 1.002~1.010]; but in the case-crossover studies, PM(10) exposure was related to increase in risk of daily stroke attack (OR per 10 μg/m(3) = 1.028, 95%CI: 1.001~1.057). PM(2.5) exposure was not significant association with daily stroke attack (OR per 10 μg/m(3) = 1.016, 95%CI: 0.937~1.097). Sensitivity analysis showed that the results for PM(10) , PM(2.5) and daily stroke attack were robust in the time-series design.

CONCLUSIONS:

We found some evidence for an effect of air pollutants on stroke attack risk.

PMID:
22672304
PMCID:
PMC6493517
DOI:
10.1111/j.1755-5949.2012.00325.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center