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AIDS Care. 2013;25(1):109-17. doi: 10.1080/09540121.2012.687814. Epub 2012 Jun 6.

Active cocaine use is associated with lack of HIV-1 virologic suppression independent of nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy: use of a rapid screening tool during routine clinic visits.

Author information

1
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA.

Abstract

Clarifying the relationship between illicit drug use and HIV-1 virologic suppression requires characterization of both illicit drug use activity and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). We developed a rapid clinical questionnaire to assess prior 7-day illicit drug use and ART adherence in a cross-sectional study among 1777 HIV-infected persons in care. Of these, 76% were male, 35% were African-American, and 8% reported injection drug use as their probable route of HIV-1 infection. Questionnaire-reported frequencies of cocaine and marijuana use within the previous 7 days were 3.3% and 12.1%, respectively. Over three quarters (77.8%) of participants were on ART, of whom 69.7% had HIV-1 virologic suppression (HIV-1 RNA<48 copies/mL). Univariate analyses revealed that compared to no use, cocaine and marijuana use were both associated with missed ART doses (P<0.01). Multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusting for nonadherence demonstrated that cocaine use was independently associated with failing to achieve virologic suppression (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 0.46; 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.22-0.98) but marijuana use was not (aOR: 1.08; 95% CI: 0.72-1.62). This result strengthens the evidence of a direct effect of cocaine on virologic control, independent of nonadherence to ART.

PMID:
22670566
PMCID:
PMC3443534
DOI:
10.1080/09540121.2012.687814
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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