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Rheumatology (Oxford). 2012 Sep;51(9):1714-20. doi: 10.1093/rheumatology/kes126. Epub 2012 Jun 1.

Relationship between vertebral fracture prevalence and abdominal aortic calcification in men.

Author information

1
Rheumatology Department, Military Hospital Mohammed V, Rabat, Morocco. aelmaghraoui@gmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study the relationship between the prevalence of vertebral fractures (VFs) using VF assessment (VFA) in asymptomatic men and the prevalence and severity of abdominal aortic calcification (AAC).

METHODS:

We enrolled 709 men with mean (s.d.) age 62.4 (8.6) (range 45-89) years. Lateral VFA images and scans of the lumbar spine and proximal femur were obtained using a GE Healthcare Lunar Prodigy densitometer. VFs were defined using a combination of the Genant semi-quantitative (SQ) approach and morphometry. VFA images were scored for AAC using a validated 24-point scale.

RESULTS:

VFA images showed that 68 (14.2%) of the participants had at least one grade 2/3 VF, 82% did not have any detectable AAC, whereas the prevalence of significant atherosclerotic burden, defined as an AAC score of ≥5, was 2.8%. The group of men with grade 2/3 VFs had a statistically significant higher AAC score and higher proportion of subjects with extended AAC, and lower weight, height and lumbar spine and hip BMD and T-scores than those without a VFA-identified VF. Multiple regression analysis showed that the presence of grade 2/3 VFs was significantly associated with BMI [odds ratio (OR 0.915; 95% CI 0.589, 0.975; P = 0.006], AAC score ≥5 (OR 4.509; 95% CI 1.505, 13.504; P = 0.007) and osteoporosis in any site (OR 5.159; 95% CI 3.116, 8.540; P ≤ 0.0001).

CONCLUSION:

In elderly men, extended AAC is an indicator of the increased risk for prevalent VFs regardless of age, BMI, history of fractures, smoking and BMD.

PMID:
22661554
DOI:
10.1093/rheumatology/kes126
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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