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Biochim Biophys Acta. 2012 Oct;1820(10):1490-5. doi: 10.1016/j.bbagen.2012.05.010. Epub 2012 Jun 1.

Conjugated linoleic acid in the maternal diet differentially enhances growth and cortical spreading depression in the rat progeny.

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1
Laboratório de Fisiologia da Nutrição Naíde Teodósio, Departamento de Nutrição, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE, 50670-901, Brazil.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are fatty acids that are found in the lipids from goat milk, and appear to protect neurons from excitotoxicity.

METHODS:

We investigated in developing rats the effects of a maternal CLA-rich diet (containing 7% lipids from goat milk) on body development and cerebral electrical activity of the progeny from dams receiving the CLA diet during gestation (G), lactation (L) or both periods (G+L).

RESULTS:

Compared to a control group (C) receiving a diet with 7% soybean oil, body weight increased at 14, 21 and 28 days, but not at 35-45 days, in L and G+L groups (P<0.05). No intergroup difference was found on body and brain weights, body length, abdominal and thoracic circumferences, body mass index and abdominal to thoracic circumference ratio at 35-45 days. In contrast, at this later age the CSD velocities of propagation were significantly higher (P<0.05) in L as compared with the C and G group, and in the L+G, as compared with the C, G and L groups, suggesting a long-lasting brain effect.

CONCLUSION:

These data indicate that a maternal CLA-rich diet can differentially influence body weight increment (short-term effect), and CSD propagation (long-term effect) in the progeny, and the lactation is the most critical period for such diet actions.

GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE:

The facilitating effect of the lipids from goat milk on an excitability-related phenomenon in the brain (CSD) can be of clinical relevance, since CSD has been associated to neurological disturbances like migraine and epilepsy.

PMID:
22659523
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbagen.2012.05.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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