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Am J Cardiol. 2012 Sep 15;110(6):884-90. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2012.04.063. Epub 2012 Jun 2.

Impact of gender on three-month outcome and left ventricular remodeling after transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

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1
Medizinische Klinik mit Schwerpunkt Kardiologie und Angiologie, Charité Campus Mitte, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

Transarterial aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a promising method for the treatment of high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. Because gender differences are known in aortic stenosis, the aim of this study was to compare procedural and short-term outcomes, left ventricular remodeling, and inflammatory status after TAVI in men and women. One hundred consecutive patients (42 men, 58 women) who underwent transfemoral TAVI (CoreValve in 83%, SAPIEN in 17%) were prospectively analyzed. Aortic stenosis severity was higher in women (mean valve area 0.7 ± 0.3 vs 0.8 ± 0.2 cm(2)). Women had better ejection fractions, smaller end-diastolic and end-systolic diameters, and more concentric hypertrophy at baseline. There were no differences in device success rate (99%), 30-day total mortality (2.4% in men, 3.4% in women), stroke (2.4% in men, 1.7% in women), or pacemaker rate (26.2% in men, 15.5% in women). Periprocedural complications and 3-month outcome were not different between the genders. After TAVI, regression of hypertrophy occurred in men and women, but improvement of the ejection fraction was significant only in women. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide decreased to similar levels in the 2 genders. C-reactive protein and interleukin-6, elevated at baseline more in men than in women, decreased after TAVI and normalized at 3 months only in women. In conclusion, women clinically benefit from TAVI to a degree similar to that of men. However, there are gender differences involving the recovery response of the left ventricle after TAVI.

PMID:
22658244
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjcard.2012.04.063
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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