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Heart Lung. 2012 Sep-Oct;41(5):446-55. doi: 10.1016/j.hrtlng.2012.04.002. Epub 2012 May 30.

Depressive symptoms and healthcare utilization in patients with noncardiac chest pain compared to patients with ischemic heart disease.

Author information

1
Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden. ghassan.mourad@liu.se

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We compared depressive symptoms and healthcare utilization in patients admitted for noncardiac chest pain, acute myocardial infarction, and angina pectoris after hospitalization and at 1-year follow-up.

METHODS:

One hundred and thirty-one patients with noncardiac chest pain, 66 with acute myocardial infarction, and 70 with angina pectoris completed a depression screening questionnaire and the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale. Healthcare utilization data were collected from a population-based, diagnosis-related database.

RESULTS:

More than 25% of respondents reported depressive symptoms, regardless of diagnosis. At follow-up, 9% had recovered, 19% were still experiencing depressive symptoms, and 13% had developed depressive symptoms. Noncardiac patients with chest pain had similar primary care contacts, but fewer hospital admissions, than patients with an acute myocardial infarction. Patients with angina pectoris and depressive symptoms used the most healthcare services.

CONCLUSIONS:

Depressive symptoms were common. Patients with noncardiac chest pain used as much primary care as did patients with an acute myocardial infarction. Interventions should focus on identifying and treating depressive symptoms.

PMID:
22652167
DOI:
10.1016/j.hrtlng.2012.04.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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