Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Cereb Cortex. 2013 Jun;23(6):1444-52. doi: 10.1093/cercor/bhs126. Epub 2012 May 29.

Impulsivity and the modular organization of resting-state neural networks.

Author information

1
Laboratory of NeuroGenetics, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA. caroline.davis@duke.edu

Abstract

Impulsivity is a complex trait associated with a range of maladaptive behaviors, including many forms of psychopathology. Previous research has implicated multiple neural circuits and neurotransmitter systems in impulsive behavior, but the relationship between impulsivity and organization of whole-brain networks has not yet been explored. Using graph theory analyses, we characterized the relationship between impulsivity and the functional segregation ("modularity") of the whole-brain network architecture derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. These analyses revealed remarkable differences in network organization across the impulsivity spectrum. Specifically, in highly impulsive individuals, regulatory structures including medial and lateral regions of the prefrontal cortex were isolated from subcortical structures associated with appetitive drive, whereas these brain areas clustered together within the same module in less impulsive individuals. Further exploration of the modular organization of whole-brain networks revealed novel shifts in the functional connectivity between visual, sensorimotor, cortical, and subcortical structures across the impulsivity spectrum. The current findings highlight the utility of graph theory analyses of resting-state fMRI data in furthering our understanding of the neurobiological architecture of complex behaviors.

KEYWORDS:

Barratt Impulsiveness Scale; functional connectivity; graph theory; neuroimaging; resting-state fMRI

PMID:
22645253
PMCID:
PMC3643719
DOI:
10.1093/cercor/bhs126
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center