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Am J Rhinol Allergy. 2012 May-Jun;26(3):e99-103. doi: 10.2500/ajra.2012.26.3777.

Nasal nitric oxide in a random sample of adults and its relationship to sensitization, cat allergen, rhinitis, and ambient nitric oxide.

Author information

1
Division of Otorhinolaryngology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Mölndal, Sweden. cecilia.alexandersson@vgreion.se

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is conflicting evidence whether nasal nitric oxide (NO) is associated with current rhinitis and with other possible predictors. Most studies have been performed in clinical cohorts and there is a lack of studies based on a general population sample. The aim of the present study was to investigate predictors for levels of nasal nitric oxide (NO) in a general population.

METHODS:

The population consisted of 357 subjects from Gothenburg participating in the follow-up of the European Respiratory Health Survey in 1999-2001. All subjects completed an extensive respiratory questionnaire. Nasal NO was measured from one nostril at a time with a sampling rate of 50 mL/s for 16 seconds and the nasal NO concentration was determined as the mean value within the plateau phase. Mattress dust samples were collected for cats and mites in a subsample of subjects. Ambient and exhaled NO was also measured. The predictors for nasal NO were analyzed in multiple linear regression models.

RESULTS:

There was no relation between the levels of nasal NO and reporting current rhinitis. Nasal NO was significantly increased among those with high levels of IgE against cats and current smokers had significantly lower nasal NO. There was also a positive association between ambient NO and nasal NO. There were no significant associations between nasal NO and sex, age, or height, or between nasal NO and measured levels of cat antigen.

CONCLUSION:

In this general population sample we found no relation between current rhinitis and nasal NO levels. There was a clear association between sensitization to cat and nasal NO, but there was no relation to current exposure to cat allergen. Our data support that nasal NO has a limited value in monitoring upper airway inflammation.

PMID:
22643936
PMCID:
PMC3906512
DOI:
10.2500/ajra.2012.26.3777
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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