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J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2012 Feb;23(1):290-301. doi: 10.1353/hpu.2012.0007.

African American parents' HPV vaccination intent and concerns.

Author information

1
Washington University in St. Louis, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, St. Louis, MO 63112, USA. vthompson@gwbmail.wustl.edu

Abstract

This study describes attitudes and social and environmental factors that affect African American parents' intent to vaccinate their daughters against human papillomavirus (HPV). Thirty African American parents of daughters aged nine to 17 years and no history of HPV infection completed semi-structured interviews. Interviews addressed factors that influenced intent to vaccinate, perception of community norms related to vaccination, vaccination scenarios involving place of vaccination, and vaccination prior to or after the child's initiation of sexual activity. A recurring theme was the influence of physician recommendation on African American parents' intent to obtain HPV vaccination for their daughters. Most parents reported that they could overcome barriers to vaccination, except vaccine costs and lack of insurance. While religious beliefs were important to parents, they reported that they would not interfere with vaccination decisions; fears of early sexuality due to vaccination were limited. The implications of these findings are discussed.

PMID:
22643477
PMCID:
PMC3601894
DOI:
10.1353/hpu.2012.0007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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