Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Neuroinflammation. 2012 May 29;9:105. doi: 10.1186/1742-2094-9-105.

Effects of human intravenous immunoglobulin on amyloid pathology and neuroinflammation in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

Author information

1
A. I. Virtanen Institute, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. Lakshman.puli@uef.fi

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Human intravenous immunoglobulin (hIVIG) preparation is indicated for treating primary immunodeficiency disorders associated with impaired humoral immunity. hIVIG is known for its anti-inflammatory properties and a decent safety profile. Therefore, by virtue of its constituent natural anti-amyloid beta antibodies and anti-inflammatory effects, hIVIG is deemed to mediate beneficial effects to patients of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we set out to explore the effects of hIVIG in a mouse model of AD.

METHODS:

We treated APP/PS1dE9 transgenic and wild-type mice with weekly injections of a high hIVIG dose (1 g/kg) or saline for 3 or 8 months. Treatment effect on brain amyloid pathology and microglial reactivity was assessed by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and confocal microscopy.

RESULTS:

We found no evidence for reduction in Aβ pathology; instead 8 months of hIVIG treatment significantly increased soluble levels of Aβ40 and Aβ42. In addition, we noticed a significant reduction in CD45 and elevation of Iba-1 markers in specific sub-populations of microglial cells. Long-term hIVIG treatment also resulted in significant suppression of TNF-α and increase in doublecortin positive adult-born neurons in the dentate gyrus.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our data indicate limited ability of hIVIG to impact amyloid burden but shows changes in microglia, pro-inflammatory gene expression, and neurogenic effects. Immunomodulation by hIVIG may account for its beneficial effect in AD patients.

PMID:
22642812
PMCID:
PMC3416679
DOI:
10.1186/1742-2094-9-105
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center