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J Nephrol. 2013 Mar-Apr;26(2):366-74. doi: 10.5301/jn.5000153. Epub 2012 May 15.

Women on hemodialysis have lower self-reported health-related quality of life scores but better survival than men.

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1
Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hemodialysis patients suffer from poor quality of life and survival. A retrospective cohort study was performed to examine the sex differences in self-reported quality of life and mortality in a Taiwanese hemodialysis cohort.

METHODS:

A total of 816 stable hemodialysis patients were included. Patients completed two questionnaires: the 36-item Short Form Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36, Taiwan Standard Version 1.0) to assess health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Chinese Version) to assess depressive mood. Mortality outcomes were recorded for a seven-year follow-up period.

RESULTS:

After adjustment for confounding factors, women had significantly higher BDI scores (P=.003), lower physical functioning (P<.001), bodily pain (P<.001), mental health (P=0007), and physical component scale (PCS) scores (P<.001). There were 284 deaths recorded. In the Cox-proportional hazard model, women had significantly lower mortality than men (P<.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Women on hemodialysis had more depression-related symptoms and poor self-reported HRQoL, but better survival than men. The sex difference in psychological and HRQoL issues deserves greater concern because this relates to clinical care and further study.

PMID:
22641579
DOI:
10.5301/jn.5000153
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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