Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Public Health Nutr. 2013 Jan;16(1):73-7. doi: 10.1017/S1368980012001309. Epub 2012 May 28.

Water and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and changes in BMI among Brazilian fourth graders after 1-year follow-up.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Social Medicine, State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rua São Francisco Xavier 524, 7° andar, Bloco E, CEP 20550-012 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. sichieri@ims.uerj.br

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We examined whether drinking water per se is associated with drinking less of other beverages and whether changes in BMI are associated with the intake of water and other beverages.

DESIGN:

Secondary analysis of a randomized trial of fourth graders followed over 1 year.

SETTING:

Public schools in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

SUBJECTS:

Participants were 1134 students aged 10-11 years.

RESULTS:

At baseline, a higher frequency of water consumption was associated with a greater daily intake of fruit juice (P = 0.02) and a higher daily frequency of milk (P = 0.005). In the intervention group, the baseline frequency of water consumption was negatively associated with weight change over 1 year but without statistical significance (coefficient = -0.08 kg/m2; 95 % CI -0.37, 0.24 kg/m2), whereas fruit juice intake frequency was positively associated with weight change: each increase in fruit juice intake of 1 glass/d was associated with a BMI increase of 0.16 (95 % CI 0.02, 0.30) kg/m2.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings do not support a protective effect of water consumption on BMI, but confirm consumption of juice drinks as a risk factor for BMI gain. Students who reported high water consumption also reported high intake of other beverages; therefore, the promotion of water consumption per se would not prevent excessive weight gain.

PMID:
22640686
DOI:
10.1017/S1368980012001309
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Cambridge University Press
Loading ...
Support Center