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Vitam Horm. 2012;89:223-39. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-394623-2.00012-3.

Serotonin conflict in sleep-feeding.

Author information

1
Department of Lifestyle Medicine, Translational Research Center, Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan.

Abstract

Short sleep duration has been suggested to be a risk factor for weight gain and adiposity. Serotonin (5-HT) substantially contributes to the regulation of sleep and feeding behavior. Although 5-HT predominately promotes waking and satiety, the effects of 5-HT depend on 5-HT receptor function. The 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors reportedly contribute to sleep-waking regulation, whereas the 5-HT1B and 5-HT2C receptors contribute to the regulation of satiety. The 5-HT1B and 2C receptors may therefore be involved in the regulation of sleep-feeding. In genetic studies, 5-HT1B receptor mutant mice display greater amounts of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) than wild-type mice, while displaying no effects on waking or slow wave sleep (SWS). On the other hand, 5-HT2C receptor mutant mice exhibit increased wakefulness and decreased SWS, without any effect on REMS. Moreover, the 5-HT2C receptor mutants display leptin-independent hyperphagia, leading to a middle-aged onset of obesity, whereas 5-HT1B receptor mutants do not display any effect on food intake. Thus, the genetic deletion of 5-HT2C receptors results in sleep loss-associated hyperphagia, leading to the late onset of obesity. This is a quite different pattern of sleep-feeding behavior than is observed in disturbed leptin signaling, which displays an increase in sleep-associated hyperphagia. In pharmacologic studies, 5-HT1B and 5-HT2C receptors upregulate wakefulness and downregulate SWS, REMS, and food intake. These findings suggest that 5-HT1B/2C receptor stimulation induces sleep loss-associated anorexia. Thus, the central 5-HT regulation of sleep-feeding can be dissociated. Functional hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin and orexin activities may contribute to the dissociated 5-HT regulation.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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