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Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2012 Aug 1;303(3):H323-31. doi: 10.1152/ajpheart.00749.2011. Epub 2012 May 25.

Protein kinase D increases maximal Ca2+-activated tension of cardiomyocyte contraction by phosphorylation of cMyBP-C-Ser315.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Genetics, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University, the Netherlands. ellen.dirkx@maastrichtUniv.nl

Abstract

Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) is involved in the regulation of cardiac myofilament contraction. Recent evidence showed that protein kinase D (PKD) is one of the kinases that phosphorylate cMyBP-C. However, the mechanism by which PKD-induced cMyBP-C phosphorylation affects cardiac contractile responses is not known. Using immunoprecipitation, we showed that, in contracting cardiomyocytes, PKD binds to cMyBP-C and phosphorylates it at Ser(315). The effect of PKD-mediated phosphorylation of cMyBP-C on cardiac myofilament function was investigated in permeabilized ventricular myocytes, isolated from wild-type (WT) and from cMyBP-C knockout (KO) mice, incubated in the presence of full-length active PKD. In WT myocytes, PKD increased both myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity (pCa(50)) and maximal Ca(2+)-activated tension of contraction (T(max)). In cMyBP-C KO skinned myocytes, PKD increased pCa(50) but did not alter T(max). This suggests that cMyBP-C is not involved in PKD-mediated sensitization of myofilaments to Ca(2+) but is essential for PKD-induced increase in T(max). Furthermore, the phosphorylation of both PKD-Ser(916) and cMyBP-C-Ser(315) was contraction frequency-dependent, suggesting that PKD-mediated cMyBP-C phosphorylation is operational primarily during periods of increased contractile activity. Thus, during high contraction frequency, PKD facilitates contraction of cardiomyocytes by increasing Ca(2+) sensitivity and by an increased T(max) through phosphorylation of cMyBP-C.

PMID:
22636676
DOI:
10.1152/ajpheart.00749.2011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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