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Brain Dev. 2013 Jan;35(1):45-52. doi: 10.1016/j.braindev.2012.03.004. Epub 2012 May 24.

The pilot study: sphingomyelin-fortified milk has a positive association with the neurobehavioural development of very low birth weight infants during infancy, randomized control trial.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan. ktanaka@juntendo.ac.jp

Abstract

AIM:

This study was a randomised control trial to examine the effects of sphingomyelin (SM), on the mental, motor and behavioural development of premature infants.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Randomised, double-blind controlled trial, enroling infants born with a birth weight of less than 1500 g between January 2004 and October 2007 at Juntendo University Hospital, with follow-up to 18 months. Twenty-four preterm babies were randomly assigned; 12 were assigned to a test group and fed SM-fortified milk (SM 20% of all phospholipids in milk) and 12 were assigned to a control group (SM 13% of all phospholipids in milk). We analysed the composition of the plasma phospholipids and red-cell-membrane fatty acids, after which VEP, Fagan, BSID-II, attention and memory tests were performed.

RESULTS:

The percentage of SM in the total phospholipids was significantly higher in the trial group than in the control group at 4, 6 and 8 weeks. The Behaviour Rating Scale of the BSID-II, the Fagan test scores, the latency of VEP, and sustained attention test scores at 18 months were all significantly better in the trial group than in the control group.

CONCLUSION:

This study is the first to report that nutritional intervention via administration of SM-fortified milk has a positive association with the neurobehavioural development of low-birth-weight infants. However, detailed studies on the effects of SM on longer-term development are required.

PMID:
22633446
DOI:
10.1016/j.braindev.2012.03.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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