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J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;51(6):582-92. doi: 10.1016/j.jaac.2012.02.016. Epub 2012 Apr 17.

Rage attacks in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: phenomenology and clinical correlates.

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1
University of South Florida, 800 6th Street South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701, USA. estorch@health.usf.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Rage attacks have been documented in youth with varied psychiatric disorders, but few data have been reported on the clinical characteristics and correlates of rage attacks among children with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

METHOD:

Participants were 86 children (ages 6-16 years) with a primary diagnosis of OCD. Patients and their primary caregiver were administered clinician-rated measures of obsessive-compulsive severity and rage severity. Children completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Child Sheehan Disability Scale-Child, whereas parents completed the Rage Attacks Questionnaire, Aberrant Behavior Checklist-Irritability Scale, Children's Affective Lability Scale, and Child Sheehan Disability Scale-Parent.

RESULTS:

Rage was common among youth with OCD and was associated with varied clinical characteristics. Rage severity accounted for functional impairment beyond the influence of obsessive-compulsive symptom severity; however, these relations were explained by the impact of family accommodation.

CONCLUSIONS:

These data suggest that rage attacks are relatively common, have a negative impact on illness presentation, and contribute to functional impairment above and beyond obsessive-compulsive symptom severity. Rage may contribute to family accommodation of symptoms, which may further affect obsessive-compulsive symptom severity and impairment.

PMID:
22632618
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaac.2012.02.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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