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J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol. 1990 Jul-Oct;10(4-5):206-13.

Time and dose-response study of the effects of vanadate in rats: changes in blood cells, serum enzymes, protein, cholesterol, glucose, calcium, and inorganic phosphate.

Author information

1
Institute of Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of California, Davis 95616.

Abstract

A daily dosage of vanadate (0.9 mgV/kg) injected subcutaneously for 16 days to adult rats produced significant changes in blood cells and serum elements. The hematological changes included an increase in white blood cell count at two days after the last injection. At five days, red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin, and packed cell volume (PCV) were low. At 12 days, there were reductions in RBC, hemoglobin, PCV, and lymphocyte counts and an increase in polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) counts. At 25 days, RBC, hemoglobin, and PCV were still low. At 40 days, the only change was a reduction in RBC. Changes in the serum at two days posttreatment were a reduction in lactic dehydrogenase activity (LDH), alkaline phosphatase activity (AP), calcium, albumin, and total protein and an increase in cholesterol. At five days, glutamic-oxalacetic transaminase (GOT), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), inorganic phosphate, and total protein were low and calcium was high. At 12 days, GOT, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT), and LDH were reduced, and the levels of calcium and cholesterol were elevated. At 25 days, there was a reduction in GPT and LDH and an increase in glucose, calcium, and albumin. At 40 days, the levels of GOT, LDH, AP, and inorganic phosphate were still low. Vanadate at lower dosage levels (0.3-0.6 mg V/kg per day for 16 days) also produced significant changes in blood cellular and serum elements but at lesser degrees of severity. These findings show that the exposure of rats repeatedly to low levels of Vanadate caused anemia, elevation in blood cholesterol levels, and a reduction in serum enzymes activities.

PMID:
2262884
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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